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T.R.'s love of Nature

    Theodore Roosevelt's African Safari & Scientific Expedition

      April 21, 1909     through     March 14, 1910

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The hunter who wanders through these lands sees sights which ever afterward remain fixed in his mind.... Apart from this, yet mingled with it, is the strong attraction of the silent places, of the large tropic moons, and the splendor of the new stars; where the wanderer sees the awful glory of sunrise and sunset in the wide waste spaces of the earth, unworn of man, and changed only by the slow change of the ages through time everlasting.


                  - Col. Theodore Roosevelt
                     in Khartoum, March 15, 1910














Theodore Roosevelt - African Safari & Scientific Expedition

Expedition Members

Newland & Tarlton, outfitters
R.J. Cunninghame, leader
Leslie J. Tarlton, adjutant
Edmund Heller, zoologist, age 34
J. Alden Loring, zoologist, age 38
Edgar A. Means, physician, age 52
Kermit Roosevelt, photographer, age 21
Theodore Roosevelt, bwana, age 50

Hunting Licenses

50gbp, 50 animals/hunter
17gbp, extra bull elephant
5gbp, extra giraffe, rhino, or eland
3gbp, extra antelope
2gbp, extra wildebeest
2gbp, extra waterbuck

Expedition Costs

$50,000 from Smithsonian Museum appeal
$25,000 from Theodore Roosevelt
$25,000 from Andrew Carnegie

2005 equivalent = appx. $1.8 million dollars

Books in T.R.'s "Pigskin Library" in T.R.'s Own Hand

T.R.'s writings about the African Safari & Scientific Expedition

Letter from T.R. to The Smithsonian regarding collected specimens

Lecture at National Geographic Society - Washington, D.C. - 18 November 1910 - "Wild Man & Wild Beast in Africa"

African Game Trails - Book format

African Game Trails - Original Manuscripts in T.R.'s Own Hand

African Game Trails - Scribner's Magazine - 1 October 1909 - "A Railroad Through the Pleistocene"

African Game Trails - Scribner's Magazine - 1 November 1909 - "On an East African Ranch : Lion-Hunting On The Kapiti Plains"

African Game Trails - Scribner's Magazine - 1 December 1909 - "On Safari: Rhinos and Giraffes"

African Game Trails - Scribner's Magazine - 1 January 1910 - "Juja Farm; Hippo and Leopard"

African Game Trails - Scribner's Magazine - 1 February 1910 - "A Buffalo Hunt Near The Kamiti"

African Game Trails - Scribner's Magazine - 1 March 1910 - "Trekking Through The Thirst Of The Sotik"

African Game Trails - Scribner's Magazine - 1 April 1910 - "Hunting in the Sotik"

African Game Trails - Scribner's Magazine - 1 May 1910 - "To Lake Naivasha"

African Game Trails - Scribner's Magazine - 1 June 1910 - "Elephant Hunting on Mount Kenia"

African Game Trails - Scribner's Magazine - 1 July 1910 - "The Guaso Nyero: A River of the Equatorial Desert"

African Game Trails - Scribner's Magazine - 1 August 1910 - "A Nandi Lion Hunt - Uganda and the Great Nyanza Lakes"

African Game Trails - Scribner's Magazine - 1 September 1910 - "The Great Rhinoceros of the Lado"



Game List

  • Lion = 9
  • Hyena = 5
  • Elephant = 8
  • Rhinoceros = 5 (square mouth)
  • Rhinoceros = 8 (hook lipped)
  • Hippopotamus = 7
  • Warthog = 8
  • Zebra (common) = 15
  • Zebra (big) = 5
  • Giraffe = 7
  • Buffalo = 6
  • Elan (giant) = 1
  • Elan (common) = 5
  • Bushbuck =2 (East African)
  • Bushbuck = 1 (Ugandan)
  • Bushbuck = 3 (Nile)
  • Roan = 4
  • Oryx = 10
  • Wildebeest = 5
  • Hartebeest = 10 (Coke's)
  • Hartebeest = 14 (Jackson's)
  • Hartebeest = 1 (Ugandan)
  • Hartebeest = 8 (Nilotic)
  • Topi = 12
  • Waterbuck = 5 (common)
  • Waterbuck = 6 (singsing)
  • Python = 3
  • Kob = 10 (common)
  • Kob = 1 (Vaughan's)
  • Kob = 3 (white eared)
  • Lechwe = 3 (saddlebacked)
  • Redbuck (bohor) = 10
  • Buck (Chanler's) = 3
  • Impalla = 7
  • Gazelle (Granti) = 5
  • Gazelle (Robertsi) = 4
  • Gazelle (Notata) = 8
  • Gazelle = 11 (Thompson's)
  • Gerenuk = 3
  • Klipspringer = 1
  • Oribi = 18
  • Duiker = 3
  • Steinbuck = 4
  • Dikdik = 1
  • Monkey = 1 (red ground)
  • Monkey = 5 (black and white ground)
  • Ostrich = 2
  • Bustard (Greater) = 4
  • Bustard (Lesser) = 1
  • Crane (kavirondo) = 2
  • Stork (whale head) = 1
  • Marabou = 1
  • Stork (saddle bill) = 2
  • Stork (ibis) = 1
  • Pelican= 5
  • Guinea fowl = 1
  • Crocodile = 1



QUICK FACTS

- from Wikipedia :


In March 1909, shortly after the end of his presidency, Roosevelt left New York for a safari in east and central Africa. Roosevelt's party landed in Mombasa, British East Africa (now Kenya), traveled to the Belgian Congo (now Democratic Republic of the Congo) before following the Nile up to Khartoum in modern Sudan. Financed by Andrew Carnegie and by his own proposed writings, Roosevelt's party hunted for specimens for the Smithsonian Institution and for the American Museum of Natural History in New York. The group included scientists from the Smithsonian and was led by the legendary hunter-tracker R.J. Cunninghame and was joined from time to time by Frederick Selous, the famous big game hunter and explorer. Among other items, Roosevelt brought with him four tons of salt for preserving animal hides, a lucky rabbit's foot given to him by boxer John L. Sullivan, an elephant-rifle donated by a group of 56 admiring Britons, and the famous Pigskin Library, a collection of classics bound in pig leather and transported in a single reinforced trunk.


All told, Roosevelt and his companions killed or trapped over 11,397 animals, from insects and moles to hippopotamuses and elephants. These included 512 big game animals, including six rare white rhinos. The expedition consumed 262 of the animals. Tons of salted animals and their skins were shipped to Washington; the quantity was so large that it took years to mount them all, and the Smithsonian was able to share many duplicate animals with other museums.


Regarding the large number of animals taken, Roosevelt said, "I can be condemned only if the existence of the National Museum, the American Museum of Natural History, and all similar zoological institutions are to be condemned." However, although the safari was ostensibly conducted in the name of science, there was another, quite large element to it as well. Along with many native peoples and local leaders, interaction with renowned professional hunters and land owning families made the safari as much a political and social event, as it was a hunting excursion. Roosevelt wrote a detailed account of the adventure in the book African Game Trails, where he describes the excitement of the chase, the people he met, and the flora and fauna he collected in the name of science.


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Theodore Roosevelt - African Safari & Scientific Expedition : A Pictorial History

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